Dimmer curves

Hello, I have some questions about dimmer curves.

If I do not select a curve, which curve does EOS use by default?

Which Curve is best for Fresnel lights like a Mole 5k, 2k or 1k? What curve is best for a Source Four Pars and which Curve is best for regular house hold light bulbs?

I tried the Incandescent curve on our lights and it lowered their intensity quite a bit, What is that Curve meant for? I am starting to think maybe it's for emulating an incandescent and shouldn't be applied to them but I am interested in finding out what the actual answer is. 

Thanks!

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  • The curves is to bend a transaction between 2 states after your will.

    A example: I have along slow fade from black and a lot of LED lights. They go bright fast and in a slow fade you get the feeling it jumps on and the last bit not much is going on. To get a smooth fade I applied a curve to that cue where the start is slow (Think it is curve 902) 

    If you do not mix a lot of fixtures types (LED, incandescent and so on) where you feel the way they fade relative to each other you do not normally need curves.But if you run LED and incandescent in sidelights as a example you may want to apply a curve to the LEDs so they do not fade on faster then the incandescent

    All this should be done before programming starts. What happen to you is that you applied a curve that is slow in the start as a incandescent light to your incandescent lights, making them slower and there fore at low values giving out less light. 

    The "non"curve is giving out 1:1 all the way. when the input say 10% the output will say 10% to. A slow start curve may say in 5% out 1%; in 10% out 5%; in 20% out 12%; in 30% out 26% slowly catching up to In 100% out 100%. (In what you say the level of the channel is, out is what the dimmer/fixture actually get)

    Here is a video on curves https://youtu.be/OUpPa5JY1M4?t=147 

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  • The curves is to bend a transaction between 2 states after your will.

    A example: I have along slow fade from black and a lot of LED lights. They go bright fast and in a slow fade you get the feeling it jumps on and the last bit not much is going on. To get a smooth fade I applied a curve to that cue where the start is slow (Think it is curve 902) 

    If you do not mix a lot of fixtures types (LED, incandescent and so on) where you feel the way they fade relative to each other you do not normally need curves.But if you run LED and incandescent in sidelights as a example you may want to apply a curve to the LEDs so they do not fade on faster then the incandescent

    All this should be done before programming starts. What happen to you is that you applied a curve that is slow in the start as a incandescent light to your incandescent lights, making them slower and there fore at low values giving out less light. 

    The "non"curve is giving out 1:1 all the way. when the input say 10% the output will say 10% to. A slow start curve may say in 5% out 1%; in 10% out 5%; in 20% out 12%; in 30% out 26% slowly catching up to In 100% out 100%. (In what you say the level of the channel is, out is what the dimmer/fixture actually get)

    Here is a video on curves https://youtu.be/OUpPa5JY1M4?t=147 

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